FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DUPAGE TOWNSHIP – MARCH 22, 2017

On March 20, 2017, DuPage Township issued a press release related to the decisions issued on March 8, 2017, by Will County Judge Roger Rickmon denying the Petitions for Judicial Review filed on behalf of five candidates for DuPage Township Trustees and Supervisor.  Those five candidates, Tracy Falese, Cecilia Loeza, Jennifer Sanneman and Carol Simpson for Township Trustee and Shirley Grzenia for Supervisor, had appealed to the Circuit Court of Will County in an attempt to have the decisions of the DuPage Township Officers Electoral Boards reversed.  The Judge issued three separate opinions and, in each case, found that there was no indication that any of the Boards’ findings were against the manifest weight of the evidence and upheld the Boards’ decisions in all five cases.  In two of those cases, the Electoral Boards found that there was a “pattern of fraud” in obtaining voters’ signatures for candidates Ms. Loeza and Ms. Grzenia; the Circuit Court determined that the Electoral Boards’ findings were not wrong given the evidence presented and that the Boards’ actions in striking the subject petition sheets was proper.  (The Judge’s decisions can be found in the records maintained by the Circuit Clerk of Will County at the Will County Courthouse; the case numbers are 17 MR 280, 17 MR 318, and 17 MR 324.)

Following the issuance of its March 20 press release, DuPage Township received additional information from one of the now former candidates.  This additional information dealt with the “pattern of fraud” issues raised during the Electoral Boards’ proceedings.  Given the recent filing of charges in DuPage County against a trustee candidate for the College of DuPage who is accused of forgery and perjury, and given the serious nature of the information provided by one of the now former candidates, DuPage Township has forwarded the additional information to both the Village of Bolingbrook Police Department and the Will County State’s Attorney’s Office for their review.

Now that this information has been forwarded to the appropriate authorities, DuPage Township and its officials will have no further comment on these matters until they have been fully investigated and pursued by the appropriate law enforcement agencies.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DUPAGE TOWNSHIP – MARCH 20, 2017

On March 8, 2017, Will County Judge Roger Rickmon denied the Petitions for Judicial Review filed on behalf of five candidates for DuPage Township Trustees and Supervisor. Those five candidates, Tracy Falese, Cecilia Loeza, Jennifer Sanneman and Carol Simpson for Township Trustee and Shirley Grzenia for Supervisor, had appealed to the Circuit Court of Will County in an attempt to have the decisions of the DuPage Township Officers Electoral Boards reversed. The Judge issued three separate opinions numbering twenty-two total pages. In each case, Judge Rickmon found that there was no indication that any of the Boards’ findings were against the manifest weight of the evidence. In two of those cases, the Electoral Boards found that there was a “pattern of fraud” in obtaining voters’ signatures for candidates Ms. Loeza and Ms. Grzenia; the Court determined that the Electoral Boards’ findings were not wrong given the evidence presented and that the Boards’ actions in striking the subject petition sheets was proper. (The Judge’s decisions can be found in the records maintained by the Circuit Clerk of Will County at the Will County Courthouse; the case numbers are 17 MR 280, 17 MR 318, and 17 MR 324.) With respect to two of the candidates, the Circuit Court affirmed the Electoral Boards’ findings that a “pattern of fraud” existed in obtaining signatures on the petitions for those candidates. Relative to a third candidate, Judge Rickmon wrote, “the board noted that, with regard to 103 of those contested signatures, the parties, as a result of a pre-hearing records check, agreed that 26 were valid and 77 were invalid. Based on the agreement between the parties, the board found that Ms. SIMPSON had filed 315 valid signatures. The number of valid signatures necessary was 325. There is no basis in the record to suggest that this decision by the board was contrary to the manifest weight of the evidence.” By way of admission and agreement, counsel for candidate Ms. Simpson conceded that her petition to run as a trustee candidate did not have enough valid signatures before the objection even needed to be considered by the Electoral Board on the remaining challenged signatures. Still, the candidates’ attorney filed an appeal on all matters. It is unfortunate that tax payer dollars have been wasted as a result of these shenanigans.

During this entire process, a few of the now former candidates used social media to blame elected officials for wasting tax payer dollars. However, it is the candidates themselves who are largely responsible for this perceived waste. The Township has no choice but to hear and decide upon objections to candidates’ petitions in the manner provided by Illinois State statutes. The Township was required by law to form the electoral boards to hear the objections. Given the complex nature of some of the statutes and laws involved, the Township retained legal counsel to assist it through the process. Any accusations by the former candidates of waste of Township dollars are completely inaccurate.